Motorola Droid RAZR Maxx review | The Verge →

I’m still completely confused as to why anyone would lock themselves into a 2 year contract with a phone that doesn’t run the lastest version of the operating system available, and...

I’m still completely confused as to why anyone would lock themselves into a 2 year contract with a phone that doesn’t run the lastest version of the operating system available, and won’t until “sometime later this year”.

Why I Hate Android →

MG Siegler, on why he hates Google/Android: Thanks to the Google/Verizon alliance on the matter, the FCC decided the compromised vision of Net Neutrality was just fine also. To be clear:...

MG Siegler, on why he hates Google/Android:

Thanks to the Google/Verizon alliance on the matter, the FCC decided the compromised vision of Net Neutrality was just fine also. To be clear: Net Neutrality was thrown out in the wireless space because Google sided with Verizon’s ridiculous and horribly conflicted stance on the matter.

It’s funny because I’d actually forgotten that this had happened. I also learned a few things about the Nexus One program. Well written and should be read (and taken with grains of salt, if you need to) by anyone with a passing interest in the mobile market these days.

Dumbass of the Moment: Asus and the Transformer Prime →

How stupid do you have to be to add GPS capability to your tablet, only to kill any practical usage of that GPS by designing your tablet in a way that...

How stupid do you have to be to add GPS capability to your tablet, only to kill any practical usage of that GPS by designing your tablet in a way that you can almost never get a GPS signal? Probably about as dumb as you’d have to be to purchase a Transformer Prime.

Android Orphans: Visualizing a Sad History of Support →

A very interesting and thorough bit of work by Michael Degusta, showing the trends for releases of iOS and Android devices, as well as OS support after release. The real shocker to me...

A very interesting and thorough bit of work by Michael Degusta, showing the trends for releases of iOS and Android devices, as well as OS support after release. The real shocker to me was how many Android phones were released at least 1 major OS release behind what was available. Very strange, and crappy for Android users.

Nexus One not getting Android 4.0 →

Marco Arment discusses the end of the line for Google’s original flagship phone, as far as getting iOS updates. Even though the Nexus One was released 7 months after the iPhone...

Marco Arment discusses the end of the line for Google’s original flagship phone, as far as getting iOS updates. Even though the Nexus One was released 7 months after the iPhone 3GS (Which did get the latest iOS update, with little to no issues), it seems it won’t be getting Ice Cream Sandwich.

John Gruber on the iPhone 4s event →

John Gruber breaks down the iPhone 4s event in a way that few others could do. As usual, the piece has insightful commentary, including this on the iOS/Android battle: If you...

John Gruber breaks down the iPhone 4s event in a way that few others could do. As usual, the piece has insightful commentary, including this on the iOS/Android battle:

If you value tech specs over practical real-world battery life, if you would like to choose from a variety of screen sizes ranging from 3-4.5 inches, if you would prefer a thicker bulkier form factor to accomodate large LTE chips and a bigger battery to power said LTE chips, then the iPhone is not and never will be the phone for you. And, lucky for you, there’s another platform, Android, that offers you everything you want.

This really hits at the crux of the difference between iOS and Android; Apple values amazing battery life, a consistant UI experience, and a low ease of use/high secure environment for iOS. If you want larger screens, cutting edge LTE radios before they have been optimized, and the freedom to do whatever you want with your device, there’s a platform for you in Android.

It’s easy for people in one camp to argue about what is the right tradeoffs to make, but Android and iOS aren’t becoming more similar; they’re becoming more divergent. And that’s really a good thing for both fans of Android and iOS. There’s plenty of room for both to be successful to the needs of different-minded customers.

The rest of Gruber’s article is required reading for anyone trying to understand Apple’s strategy or direction.

Otterbox flames the fires of iPhone 4s/iPhone 5 fever →

Remember how many people were hyping cases for the Droid of the Month before it was released? Or even announced? Oh right. No one. ‘Cause no one gives a shit.

Remember how many people were hyping cases for the Droid of the Month before it was released? Or even announced?

Oh right. No one. ‘Cause no one gives a shit.